VESPA

THIS IS A CALL TO ARMS TO ALL YOU ENVIRONMENTAISTS
 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/sep/25/predatory-hornet-sighting-paris-france

http://inpn.mnhn.fr/espece/cd_nom/433590
 





THIS IS THE MOST SERIOUS DANGEROUS THREAT FROM ASIA TO DATE IT IS IMPERATIVE TO KEEP IT OUT FROM THE UK IT IS SPREADING LIKE WILDFIRE IN FRANCE IT IS AT THE BORDERS WE SHOULD THINK AS OUR FORE FATHERS IN 1938. ONCE IT'S HERE THERE WILL BE NO STOPPING IT I HAVE A FEW IDEARS:-

 

THERE SHOULD A TOTAL BAN ON ALL PLANT AND SOIL INPORTS.from France NOW NOT TOMORROW NO SITTING AROUND SCRACHING HEADS NO WAITING FOR THE BRUSSEL SPROUT GANGSTERS TO GET OF THEIR FLABBY ASSES AND ENGAGE THEIR SELF INDULLGENT BRAINS  ALL SOUTHERN PORTS AND SURROUNDING AREAS MUST BE MONITORED

TRAPS TO BE SETUP
 

I propose that a car & truck
 

underside washes at all French or
 

GB ports be set-up  - Wanted
 

Alive or Dead Posters put up at
 

all ports - we must communicate
 

the EMERGENCY with the port



 

Authorities the Shipping
 

Companies a passenger ticket
 

awareness  campaign BE SETUP
 

ARE YOU WILLING TO PROTECT
 

YOUR LAND FROM THIS
 

INVASION GIVE US A HAND IT'S
 

YOUR LAND THAT'S UNDER
 

THREAT
 

I'm prepared to put up my money
 

were my mouth IS to get the ball
 

rolling

 

are you willing to protect your
 

land from this invasion give us a
 

hand it's your land that under
 

threat
 

don't stand on the sideline
 

waiting for the authorities - their
 

ass-leep they'll form a committee
 

to form a committee to set up a
 

fink tank to put it out to tender
 

for a 100.000 worded report to
 

go to the committee of the
 

committee for its evaluation of
 

the costings ect ect by the time
 

they've evaluated the costing the
 

little buggers will here and
 

setting up camp then o dear it'll
 

be too late for the our bizzie bee
 

so if there's someone or body out



 

there you know my number give
 

me a ring
 

 

the last hip pie as some would say a little bizzie hippie bee that's me
 

519 have had a peep there must be some youg hips out there we were the path finders a lot fell by the way i'm sure there's must be a few oldens out there wanting something worth while to do it is our time as it was in 69 if you can remember as i do

andy plimsoles or as it is the adi granth

 

French Asian hornet invasion claims first victims

The death of a man stung by an Asian hornet has exacerbated fears over the
invasive species that has taken France by storm and could reach Britain within THREE YEARS There are now thought to be 2.000 nests in France the battlefront has reached the shores of northern Brittany. Two nests were recently found in Spain
 

                        VESPA VELUTINA

 

        There are now thought to be 2,000 nests and the voracious insects'


 

 

 VESPA VELUTINA

 

Patrice Verry, 38, was stung by one of the predators on Saturday after trying
to wave it away with a kitchen towel at a barbecue in Lherm, in the
Haute-Garonne region of southwestern France.

He collapsed minutes later and never regained consciousness, police said. In
June another man died in the Médoc region after receiving several stings.

The local mayor said the number of hornet nests had "exploded" in the area.
"Our villages are powerless," said Jean Aycaguer.

The species Vespa velutina is thought to have arrived in southwestern France
from the Far East in a consignment of Chinese pottery in late 2004.

The bee-eating invaders, unmistakable due to their dark hue and yellow feet,
first settled in the forests of Aquitaine, but quickly spread to surrounding
areas along waterways, thriving due to a total lack of indigenous predators.


 

According to Franck Muller of the Museum of National History in Paris, given
their current rate of progress – roughly one French department per year – they
will cross into Britain within "three to four years".

"We have modelled its potential spread by cross-checking data from France and
Asia, and concluded it is capable of living anywhere in Europe and certainly in
Britain," said Mr Muller.

However, experts said the hornets should not be cause for panic.

"Vespa velutina is not aggressive, at least not alone, but can potentially
become dangerous and attack as a group if it feels threatened," said Denis
Thiery, from the national agricultural research institute, INRA, in Bordeaux.

Besides, its widespread presence means it is now impossible to eradicate.
"This species is now part of French fauna. We'll just have to get used to living
with it," said Claire Villemant of the Museum of National History.


 

 

An Asian hornet (Vespa velutina) destroys hives and decimates the bee swarms. Photograph: Regis Duvignau/Reuters

The Asian hornet arrived in France in 2004 and has become the scourge of all amateur beekeepers. From the beginning of August, Frédéric Wielezynski, a beekeeper in the Médoc region of France, spends every weekend tirelessly repeating the same futile gestures. He positions himself in front of his hives armed with a fly swat and tries to crush the enormous bee-eating hornets. These are not just any hornets, but the Asian Vespa velutina. "I know it's useless, because a dozen more will arrive as soon as my back is turned, but I have to do something," said Wielezynski, president of the Gironde and Aquitaine beekeepers' association. "I love my bees and I can't just stand by and see them being eaten up without doing anything about it."

The attacks are quite impressive. Groups of five or 10 hornets hover in front of a hive waiting for the return of the forager bees. "It's like a barbarian invasion, they destroy everything in their path," said Richard Legrand, vice-president of the beekeepers association in Dordogne, one of the worst-hit departments in France. Once the Vespa velutina has got hold of its prey, it attaches itself to a branch and begins its sinister dismantling of the bee. First the head falls to the ground, then the wings and the legs. The hornet keeps only the protein-rich thorax, which it carries back to its nest for the hungry larvae.

From September, when there are fewer bees guarding the hives, the hornets even enter them and eat the brood. In any case, by then the bees are too frightened to go out. It's a vicious circle, according to Wielezynski. "If they don't go out there's less food and water in the hive, so the queen stops  laying eggs and the bee population grows weaker and older. Then it's far more likely to die before the onset of winter."

The Asian hornets – distinguished by their  yellow feet – first appeared in Tonneins in the Lot-et-Garonne department of south-west France in 2004. They probably started with a few queens hibernating in some Chinese pottery imported by a local bonsai producer. "We're almost certain that they are from China, probably a province near Shanghai," said Claire Villemant, entomologist at the Natural History Museum and co-ordinator of a research project financed by the European Apiculture Programme.

The results of the research published by the museum last June show how the insect has spread from three nests recorded in 2004 in a single department to nearly 2,000 in 2010 across 39 departments. Two nests have recently been reported in Spain for the first time. "Every year they spread by some 100km, with a very large presence in Aquitaine, where the climate is as good as in their original habitat in China, if not better,"  observed Quentin Rome, a researcher at the Natural History Museum. According to the study, the hornet is likely to acclimatise in most European countries, especially along the Atlantic coast and the northern Mediterranean. Eastern Europe and Turkey may also be overrun in the future.

Yet the Asian hornet has not been classified as a pest. It causes considerable damage to amateur beekeepers, but the professional ones, who account for 60% of France's honey production, have been spared overall.

There is also the matter of stings. In the Médoc region last June a 50-year-old woman died from Asian hornet stings. Nevertheless there does not appear to be any specific public health problem and hospitals in Agen, Bergerac and Bordeaux, near the regions with the highest hornet populations, have not observed an increase in cases. "Vespa velutina is not usually aggressive when alone, but is potentially dangerous and may attack if it feels threatened and is with its fellow hornets," explained Denis Thiery, head of a research programme in Bordeaux's National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA). His unit has been working on ways to trap the hornet.

To date no entirely reliable technique has been found."In any case, we've got to be realistic," said Villemant. "That species is now part of our own, so we're going to have to learn to live with it."
 

Asian Hornet
 

Vespa velutina, Frelon Asiatique

The Asian Hornet is a relatively new arrival in France entering it is thought, in Bordeaux on-board a pottery shipment from China. It rapidly spread through the surrounding area following the water courses and we first saw Asian hornets in our area of Poitou-Charentes in late 2008.  In September 2009, there were sightings north of Paris. Click here for a map that shows its rapid expansion across France. It is now said that wherever you are in Poitou-Charentes, you are only less than 250m from an Asian Hornet nest…

The most comprehensive summary of the key characteristics can be found on INPN, the French National Natural Heritage site (Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel) but this page is only available in French so we have summarised some important features …..
 

Identification

The Asian Hornet is smaller than the European Hornet and much darker – queens are up to 3cm and  workers 2.5cm.  Their thorax is velvety black/dark brown with brown abdominal segments bordered with fine orange band and the 4th segment is almost completely orange or yellow in colour. Legs are brown with yellow tips and their head black with yellow/orange face.

Nest

The beige / brown nest is constructed using paper mâché made from chewed tree and plant material. Several wafers of cells are surrounded with double skinned reinforcements – sometimes 5 or 6 layers deep.  Unlike the European hornet the entrances are on the sides, not on or near the bottom. European Hornets construct nests in cavities, whereas the Asian builds a suspended nest – normally in open roof spaces or trees. The nests are spherical/oval in shape and up to 1m height / 80cm diameter – usually 4 to 15m from the ground. The nest is well camouflaged and often difficult to see until trees lose their leaves.

Here are some pictures of a small nest that we destroyed in the summer of 2009 (click on any picture to view the slideshow)
 

Asian Hornets and Bee hives

Asian Hornets are a key predator of bees and if unchecked they can cause catastrophic failure of  a hive. It has been recorded that in urban situations some 80% of an Asian Hornet’s diet is bees and in rural situations this drops to about 55 – 60% with the remainder being insects, butterflies and sugar heavy fruit. Their mode of attack is is to hover about 30cm from the entrance to a beehive, pouncing and grabbing the slower returning bees carrying heavy pollen. They take them to the ground and cut off their heads using their mandibles  before taking them to a perch where they remove the legs and wings. Finally, they carry the body back to their nest to feed the larvae.
After locating hives, the hornets prey in numbers which can have a devestating effect on the bee colony as they reduce bee numbers and therefore the amount of pollen / nectar flow entering the hive. This results in the death of the developing larvae. The queens will then either stop or reduce laying eggs leading to a sharp decline in the colony which will also be susceptible to disease due to the poor conditions within the hive.

Risk levels to hive

  • 2 hornets – a healthy hive can cope and maintain normal activity

  • 3/5 hornets -  they disturb the normal activity of the hive and weak hives may succumb

  • 5+ – even healthy hives will have problems unless solution found.

Lifecycle

Asian Hornets only live for one year – at the end of summer the workers and males die off and the queen hibernates. In early May she re-awakens and starts looking for a possible nesting place – we often see queens searching our barns and garden for a place to settle in Spring. If you see an Asian Hornet at this time of year then it is most likely a queen so dispatching it now will reduce the number of nests in the area.

Asian Hornets and Humans

Their sting is similar to ordinary wasps and each hornet is capable of stinging multiples time. They are non-aggressive unless provoked by getting too close to nest, the waving hands or direct attack. The danger from hornets is not the individual sting but multiple stings from busy nests – each hornet is able to sting several times. Obviously, people allergic to stings need immediate treatment as with any other sting.

Removal

Small nests at the start of the season Spring can be destroyed by a powerful aerosol spray (see the one we destroyed above). However larger nests need professional removal – either by the Pompiers or a professional exterminator. To find your local removal expert, ask at your Mairie – Asian Hornets are a notifiable pest and therefore all Mairies should be able to tell you how to get rid of them DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THEM YOURSELF as this can be very dangerous – on entering a nest, 90% of the Asian Hornets present in the nest will come out to attack you. Recently a local farmer tried to shoot a large nest down and was lucky to escape without serious injury – definitely not a good idea! The local Pompiers came and removed the nest, it was at least 1m long and must have contained thousands of hornets – oowww!

Protecting your hives

The best idea is to make traps and place nearby – Planete Passion have a template for simple trap to follow. We have also found that a long handled badminton racket makes a great deterrent if you see a hornet hovering above the hive!

Natural Predators

It has been reported that several species of birds attack nests and feed on the young including magpies and jays.


 

 



THIS IS A CALL TO ARMS TO ALL YOU ENVIRONMENTAISTS
 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/sep/25/predatory-hornet-sighting-paris-france

http://inpn.mnhn.fr/espece/cd_nom/433590
 





THIS IS THE MOST SERIOUS DANGEROUS THREAT FROM ASIA TO DATE IT IS IMPERATIVE TO KEEP IT OUT FROM THE UK IT IS SPREADING LIKE WILDFIRE IN FRANCE IT IS AT THE BORDERS WE SHOULD THINK AS OUR FORE FATHERS IN 1938. ONCE IT'S HERE THERE WILL BE NO STOPPING IT I HAVE A FEW IDEARS:-

 THERE SHOULD A TOTAL BAN ON ALL PLANT AND SOIL INPORTS.from France NOW NOT TOMORROW NO SITTING AROUND SCRACHING HEADS NO WAITING FOR THE BRUSSEL SPROUT GANGSTERS TO GET OF THEIR FLABBY ASSES AND ENGAGE THEIR SELF INDULLGENT BRAINS  ALL SOUTHERN PORTS AND SURROUNDING AREAS MUST BE MONITORED

  TRAPS TO BE SETUP
 

I propose that a car & truck
 

underside washes at all French or
 

GB ports be set-up  - Wanted
 

Alive or Dead Posters put up at
 

all ports - we must communicate
 

the EMERGENCY with the port



 

Authorities the Shipping
 

Companies a passenger ticket
 

awareness  campaign BE SETUP
 

ARE YOU WILLING TO PROTECT
 

YOUR LAND FROM THIS
 

INVASION GIVE US A HAND IT'S
 

YOUR LAND THAT'S UNDER
 

THREAT
 

I'm prepared to put up my money
 

were my mouth IS to get the ball
 

rolling

 

are you willing to protect your
 

land from this invasion give us a
 

hand it's your land that under
 

threat
 

don't stand on the sideline
 

waiting for the authorities - their
 

ass-leep they'll form a committee
 

to form a committee to set up a
 

fink tank to put it out to tender
 

for a 100.000 worded report to
 

go to the committee of the
 

committee for its evaluation of
 

the costings ect ect by the time
 

they've evaluated the costing the
 

little buggers will here and
 

setting up camp then o dear it'll
 

be too late for the our bizzie bee
 

so if there's someone or body out



 

there you know my number give
 

me a ring
 

 

the last hip pie as some would say a little bizzie hippie bee that's me
 

519 have had a peep there must be some youg hips out there we were the path finders a lot fell by the way i'm sure there's must be a few oldens out there wanting something worth while to do it is our time as it was in 69 if you can remember as i do

andy plimsoles or as it is the adi granth

 

French Asian hornet invasion claims first victims

The death of a man stung by an Asian hornet has exacerbated fears over the
invasive species that has taken France by storm and could reach Britain within THREE YEARS There are now thought to be 2.000 nests in France the battlefront has reached the shores of northern Brittany. Two nests were recently found in Spain
 

                        VESPA VELUTINA

 

        There are now thought to be 2,000 nests and the voracious insects'




 

 

 VESPA VELUTINA

 

Patrice Verry, 38, was stung by one of the predators on Saturday after trying
to wave it away with a kitchen towel at a barbecue in Lherm, in the
Haute-Garonne region of southwestern France.

He collapsed minutes later and never regained consciousness, police said. In
June another man died in the Médoc region after receiving several stings.

The local mayor said the number of hornet nests had "exploded" in the area.
"Our villages are powerless," said Jean Aycaguer.

The species Vespa velutina is thought to have arrived in southwestern France
from the Far East in a consignment of Chinese pottery in late 2004.

The bee-eating invaders, unmistakable due to their dark hue and yellow feet,
first settled in the forests of Aquitaine, but quickly spread to surrounding
areas along waterways, thriving due to a total lack of indigenous predators.








 

According to Franck Muller of the Museum of National History in Paris, given
their current rate of progress – roughly one French department per year – they
will cross into Britain within "three to four years".

"We have modelled its potential spread by cross-checking data from France and
Asia, and concluded it is capable of living anywhere in Europe and certainly in
Britain," said Mr Muller.

However, experts said the hornets should not be cause for panic.

"Vespa velutina is not aggressive, at least not alone, but can potentially
become dangerous and attack as a group if it feels threatened," said Denis
Thiery, from the national agricultural research institute, INRA, in Bordeaux.

Besides, its widespread presence means it is now impossible to eradicate.
"This species is now part of French fauna. We'll just have to get used to living
with it," said Claire Villemant of the Museum of National History.




 






 

An Asian hornet (Vespa velutina) destroys hives and decimates the bee swarms. Photograph: Regis Duvignau/Reuters

The Asian hornet arrived in France in 2004 and has become the scourge of all amateur beekeepers. From the beginning of August, Frédéric Wielezynski, a beekeeper in the Médoc region of France, spends every weekend tirelessly repeating the same futile gestures. He positions himself in front of his hives armed with a fly swat and tries to crush the enormous bee-eating hornets. These are not just any hornets, but the Asian Vespa velutina. "I know it's useless, because a dozen more will arrive as soon as my back is turned, but I have to do something," said Wielezynski, president of the Gironde and Aquitaine beekeepers' association. "I love my bees and I can't just stand by and see them being eaten up without doing anything about it."

The attacks are quite impressive. Groups of five or 10 hornets hover in front of a hive waiting for the return of the forager bees. "It's like a barbarian invasion, they destroy everything in their path," said Richard Legrand, vice-president of the beekeepers association in Dordogne, one of the worst-hit departments in France. Once the Vespa velutina has got hold of its prey, it attaches itself to a branch and begins its sinister dismantling of the bee. First the head falls to the ground, then the wings and the legs. The hornet keeps only the protein-rich thorax, which it carries back to its nest for the hungry larvae.

From September, when there are fewer bees guarding the hives, the hornets even enter them and eat the brood. In any case, by then the bees are too frightened to go out. It's a vicious circle, according to Wielezynski. "If they don't go out there's less food and water in the hive, so the queen stops  laying eggs and the bee population grows weaker and older. Then it's far more likely to die before the onset of winter."

The Asian hornets – distinguished by their  yellow feet – first appeared in Tonneins in the Lot-et-Garonne department of south-west France in 2004. They probably started with a few queens hibernating in some Chinese pottery imported by a local bonsai producer. "We're almost certain that they are from China, probably a province near Shanghai," said Claire Villemant, entomologist at the Natural History Museum and co-ordinator of a research project financed by the European Apiculture Programme.

The results of the research published by the museum last June show how the insect has spread from three nests recorded in 2004 in a single department to nearly 2,000 in 2010 across 39 departments. Two nests have recently been reported in Spain for the first time. "Every year they spread by some 100km, with a very large presence in Aquitaine, where the climate is as good as in their original habitat in China, if not better,"  observed Quentin Rome, a researcher at the Natural History Museum. According to the study, the hornet is likely to acclimatise in most European countries, especially along the Atlantic coast and the northern Mediterranean. Eastern Europe and Turkey may also be overrun in the future.

Yet the Asian hornet has not been classified as a pest. It causes considerable damage to amateur beekeepers, but the professional ones, who account for 60% of France's honey production, have been spared overall.

There is also the matter of stings. In the Médoc region last June a 50-year-old woman died from Asian hornet stings. Nevertheless there does not appear to be any specific public health problem and hospitals in Agen, Bergerac and Bordeaux, near the regions with the highest hornet populations, have not observed an increase in cases. "Vespa velutina is not usually aggressive when alone, but is potentially dangerous and may attack if it feels threatened and is with its fellow hornets," explained Denis Thiery, head of a research programme in Bordeaux's National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA). His unit has been working on ways to trap the hornet.

To date no entirely reliable technique has been found."In any case, we've got to be realistic," said Villemant. "That species is now part of our own, so we're going to have to learn to live with it."
 

Asian Hornet
 

Vespa velutina, Frelon Asiatique

The Asian Hornet is a relatively new arrival in France entering it is thought, in Bordeaux on-board a pottery shipment from China. It rapidly spread through the surrounding area following the water courses and we first saw Asian hornets in our area of Poitou-Charentes in late 2008.  In September 2009, there were sightings north of Paris. Click here for a map that shows its rapid expansion across France. It is now said that wherever you are in Poitou-Charentes, you are only less than 250m from an Asian Hornet nest…

The most comprehensive summary of the key characteristics can be found on INPN, the French National Natural Heritage site (Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel) but this page is only available in French so we have summarised some important features …..
 

Identification

The Asian Hornet is smaller than the European Hornet and much darker – queens are up to 3cm and  workers 2.5cm.  Their thorax is velvety black/dark brown with brown abdominal segments bordered with fine orange band and the 4th segment is almost completely orange or yellow in colour. Legs are brown with yellow tips and their head black with yellow/orange face.

Nest

The beige / brown nest is constructed using paper mâché made from chewed tree and plant material. Several wafers of cells are surrounded with double skinned reinforcements – sometimes 5 or 6 layers deep.  Unlike the European hornet the entrances are on the sides, not on or near the bottom. European Hornets construct nests in cavities, whereas the Asian builds a suspended nest – normally in open roof spaces or trees. The nests are spherical/oval in shape and up to 1m height / 80cm diameter – usually 4 to 15m from the ground. The nest is well camouflaged and often difficult to see until trees lose their leaves.

Here are some pictures of a small nest that we destroyed in the summer of 2009 (click on any picture to view the slideshow)
 

Asian Hornets and Bee hives

Asian Hornets are a key predator of bees and if unchecked they can cause catastrophic failure of  a hive. It has been recorded that in urban situations some 80% of an Asian Hornet’s diet is bees and in rural situations this drops to about 55 – 60% with the remainder being insects, butterflies and sugar heavy fruit. Their mode of attack is is to hover about 30cm from the entrance to a beehive, pouncing and grabbing the slower returning bees carrying heavy pollen. They take them to the ground and cut off their heads using their mandibles  before taking them to a perch where they remove the legs and wings. Finally, they carry the body back to their nest to feed the larvae.
After locating hives, the hornets prey in numbers which can have a devestating effect on the bee colony as they reduce bee numbers and therefore the amount of pollen / nectar flow entering the hive. This results in the death of the developing larvae. The queens will then either stop or reduce laying eggs leading to a sharp decline in the colony which will also be susceptible to disease due to the poor conditions within the hive.

Risk levels to hive

  • 2 hornets – a healthy hive can cope and maintain normal activity

  • 3/5 hornets -  they disturb the normal activity of the hive and weak hives may succumb

  • 5+ – even healthy hives will have problems unless solution found.

Lifecycle

Asian Hornets only live for one year – at the end of summer the workers and males die off and the queen hibernates. In early May she re-awakens and starts looking for a possible nesting place – we often see queens searching our barns and garden for a place to settle in Spring. If you see an Asian Hornet at this time of year then it is most likely a queen so dispatching it now will reduce the number of nests in the area.

Asian Hornets and Humans

Their sting is similar to ordinary wasps and each hornet is capable of stinging multiples time. They are non-aggressive unless provoked by getting too close to nest, the waving hands or direct attack. The danger from hornets is not the individual sting but multiple stings from busy nests – each hornet is able to sting several times. Obviously, people allergic to stings need immediate treatment as with any other sting.

Removal

Small nests at the start of the season Spring can be destroyed by a powerful aerosol spray (see the one we destroyed above). However larger nests need professional removal – either by the Pompiers or a professional exterminator. To find your local removal expert, ask at your Mairie – Asian Hornets are a notifiable pest and therefore all Mairies should be able to tell you how to get rid of them DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THEM YOURSELF as this can be very dangerous – on entering a nest, 90% of the Asian Hornets present in the nest will come out to attack you. Recently a local farmer tried to shoot a large nest down and was lucky to escape without serious injury – definitely not a good idea! The local Pompiers came and removed the nest, it was at least 1m long and must have contained thousands of hornets – oowww!

Protecting your hives

The best idea is to make traps and place nearby – Planete Passion have a template for simple trap to follow. We have also found that a long handled badminton racket makes a great deterrent if you see a hornet hovering above the hive!

Natural Predators

It has been reported that several species of birds attack nests and feed on the young including magpies and jays.




 



 



THIS IS A CALL TO ARMS TO ALL YOU ENVIRONMENTAISTS

http://inpn.mnhn.fr/espece/cd_nom/433590

  •  

THIS IS THE MOST SERIOUS DANGEROUS THREAT FROM ASIA TO DATE IT IS IMPERATIVE TO KEEP IT OUT FROM THE UK IT IS SPREADING LIKE WILDFIRE IN FRANCE IT IS AT THE BORDERS WE SHOULD THINK AS OUR FORE FATHERS IN 1938. ONCE IT'S HERE THERE WILL BE NO STOPPING IT I HAVE A FEW IDEARS:-

THERE SHOULD A TOTAL BAN ON ALL PLANT AND SOIL INPORTS.from France NOW NOT TOMORROW NO SITTING AROUND SCRACHING HEADS NO WAITING FOR THE BRUSSEL SPROUT GANGSTERS TO GET OF THEIR FLABBY ASSES AND ENGAGE THEIR SELF INDULLGENT BRAINS  ALL SOUTHERN PORTS AND SURROUNDING AREAS MUST BE MONITORED

  TRAPS TO BE SETUP

I propose that a car & truck underside washes at all French or
 

GB ports be set-up  - Wanted

Alive or Dead Posters put up at all ports - we must communicate

the EMERGENCY with the p

Authorities the Shipping
 

Companies a passenger ticket
 

awareness  campaign BE SETUP

 

 

ARE YOU WILLING TO PROTECT
 

YOUR LAND FROM THIS
 

INVASION GIVE US A HAND IT'S
 

YOUR LAND THAT'S UNDER
 

THREAT
 

I'm prepared to put up my money
 

were my mouth IS to get the ball
 

rolling

 

are you willing to protect your
 

land from this invasion give us a
 

hand it's your land that under
 

threat
 

don't stand on the sideline
 

waiting for the authorities - their
 

ass-leep they'll form a committee
 

to form a committee to set up a
 

fink tank to put it out to tender
 

for a 100.000 worded report to
 

go to the committee of the
 

committee for its evaluation of
 

the costings ect ect by the time
 

they've evaluated the costing the
 

little buggers will here and
 

setting up camp then o dear it'll
 

be too late for the our bizzie bee
 

so if there's someone or body out



 

there you know my number give
 

me a ring
 

 

the last hip pie as some would say a little bizzie hippie bee that's me
 

519 have had a peep there must be some youg hips out there we were the path finders a lot fell by the way i'm sure there's must be a few oldens out there wanting something worth while to do it is our time as it was in 69 if you can remember as i do

andy plimsoles or as it is the adi granth

 

French Asian hornet invasion claims first victims

The death of a man stung by an Asian hornet has exacerbated fears over the
invasive species that has taken France by storm and could reach Britain within THREE YEARS There are now thought to be 2.000 nests in France the battlefront has reached the shores of northern Brittany. Two nests were recently found in Spain

 

                        VESPA VELUTINA

 

        There are now thought to be 2,000 nests and the voracious insects'

 

 

 

VESPA VELUTINA

 

Patrice Verry, 38, was stung by one of the predators on Saturday after trying
to wave it away with a kitchen towel at a barbecue in Lherm, in the
Haute-Garonne region of southwestern France.

He collapsed minutes later and never regained consciousness, police said. In
June another man died in the Médoc region after receiving several stings.

The local mayor said the number of hornet nests had "exploded" in the area.
"Our villages are powerless," said Jean Aycaguer.

The species Vespa velutina is thought to have arrived in southwestern France
from the Far East in a consignment of Chinese pottery in late 2004.

The bee-eating invaders, unmistakable due to their dark hue and yellow feet,
first settled in the forests of Aquitaine, but quickly spread to surrounding
areas along waterways, thriving due to a total lack of indigenous predators.

 

According to Franck Muller of the Museum of National History in Paris, given
their current rate of progress – roughly one French department per year – they
will cross into Britain within "three to four years".

"We have modelled its potential spread by cross-checking data from France and
Asia, and concluded it is capable of living anywhere in Europe and certainly in
Britain," said Mr Muller.

However, experts said the hornets should not be cause for panic.

"Vespa velutina is not aggressive, at least not alone, but can potentially
become dangerous and attack as a group if it feels threatened," said Denis
Thiery, from the national agricultural research institute, INRA, in Bordeaux.

Besides, its widespread presence means it is now impossible to eradicate.
"This species is now part of French fauna. We'll just have to get used to living
with it," said Claire Villemant of the Museum of National History.

 

 

An Asian hornet (Vespa velutina) destroys hives and decimates the bee swarms. Photograph: Regis Duvignau/Reuters

The Asian hornet arrived in France in 2004 and has become the scourge of all amateur beekeepers. From the beginning of August, Frédéric Wielezynski, a beekeeper in the Médoc region of France, spends every weekend tirelessly repeating the same futile gestures. He positions himself in front of his hives armed with a fly swat and tries to crush the enormous bee-eating hornets. These are not just any hornets, but the Asian Vespa velutina. "I know it's useless, because a dozen more will arrive as soon as my back is turned, but I have to do something," said Wielezynski, president of the Gironde and Aquitaine beekeepers' association. "I love my bees and I can't just stand by and see them being eaten up without doing anything about it."

The attacks are quite impressive. Groups of five or 10 hornets hover in front of a hive waiting for the return of the forager bees. "It's like a barbarian invasion, they destroy everything in their path," said Richard Legrand, vice-president of the beekeepers association in Dordogne, one of the worst-hit departments in France. Once the Vespa velutina has got hold of its prey, it attaches itself to a branch and begins its sinister dismantling of the bee. First the head falls to the ground, then the wings and the legs. The hornet keeps only the protein-rich thorax, which it carries back to its nest for the hungry larvae.

From September, when there are fewer bees guarding the hives, the hornets even enter them and eat the brood. In any case, by then the bees are too frightened to go out. It's a vicious circle, according to Wielezynski. "If they don't go out there's less food and water in the hive, so the queen stops  laying eggs and the bee population grows weaker and older. Then it's far more likely to die before the onset of winter."

The Asian hornets – distinguished by their  yellow feet – first appeared in Tonneins in the Lot-et-Garonne department of south-west France in 2004. They probably started with a few queens hibernating in some Chinese pottery imported by a local bonsai producer. "We're almost certain that they are from China, probably a province near Shanghai," said Claire Villemant, entomologist at the Natural History Museum and co-ordinator of a research project financed by the European Apiculture Programme.

The results of the research published by the museum last June show how the insect has spread from three nests recorded in 2004 in a single department to nearly 2,000 in 2010 across 39 departments. Two nests have recently been reported in Spain for the first time. "Every year they spread by some 100km, with a very large presence in Aquitaine, where the climate is as good as in their original habitat in China, if not better,"  observed Quentin Rome, a researcher at the Natural History Museum. According to the study, the hornet is likely to acclimatise in most European countries, especially along the Atlantic coast and the northern Mediterranean. Eastern Europe and Turkey may also be overrun in the future.

Yet the Asian hornet has not been classified as a pest. It causes considerable damage to amateur beekeepers, but the professional ones, who account for 60% of France's honey production, have been spared overall.

There is also the matter of stings. In the Médoc region last June a 50-year-old woman died from Asian hornet stings. Nevertheless there does not appear to be any specific public health problem and hospitals in Agen, Bergerac and Bordeaux, near the regions with the highest hornet populations, have not observed an increase in cases. "Vespa velutina is not usually aggressive when alone, but is potentially dangerous and may attack if it feels threatened and is with its fellow hornets," explained Denis Thiery, head of a research programme in Bordeaux's National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA). His unit has been working on ways to trap the hornet.

To date no entirely reliable technique has been found."In any case, we've got to be realistic," said Villemant. "That species is now part of our own, so we're going to have to learn to live with it."
 

Asian Hornet
 

 

 

Vespa velutina, Frelon Asiatique

The Asian Hornet is a relatively new arrival in France entering it is thought, in Bordeaux on-board a pottery shipment from China. It rapidly spread through the surrounding area following the water courses and we first saw Asian hornets in our area of Poitou-Charentes in late 2008.  In September 2009, there were sightings north of Paris. Click here for a map that shows its rapid expansion across France. It is now said that wherever you are in Poitou-Charentes, you are only less than 250m from an Asian Hornet nest…

The most comprehensive summary of the key characteristics can be found on INPN, the French National Natural Heritage site (Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel) but this page is only available in French so we have summarised some important features …..
 

Identification

The Asian Hornet is smaller than the European Hornet and much darker – queens are up to 3cm and  workers 2.5cm.  Their thorax is velvety black/dark brown with brown abdominal segments bordered with fine orange band and the 4th segment is almost completely orange or yellow in colour. Legs are brown with yellow tips and their head black with yellow/orange face.

Nest

The beige / brown nest is constructed using paper mâché made from chewed tree and plant material. Several wafers of cells are surrounded with double skinned reinforcements – sometimes 5 or 6 layers deep.  Unlike the European hornet the entrances are on the sides, not on or near the bottom. European Hornets construct nests in cavities, whereas the Asian builds a suspended nest – normally in open roof spaces or trees. The nests are spherical/oval in shape and up to 1m height / 80cm diameter – usually 4 to 15m from the ground. The nest is well camouflaged and often difficult to see until trees lose their leaves.

Here are some pictures of a small nest that we destroyed in the summer of 2009 (click on any picture to view the slideshow)
 

Asian Hornets and Bee hives

Asian Hornets are a key predator of bees and if unchecked they can cause catastrophic failure of  a hive. It has been recorded that in urban situations some 80% of an Asian Hornet’s diet is bees and in rural situations this drops to about 55 – 60% with the remainder being insects, butterflies and sugar heavy fruit. Their mode of attack is is to hover about 30cm from the entrance to a beehive, pouncing and grabbing the slower returning bees carrying heavy pollen. They take them to the ground and cut off their heads using their mandibles  before taking them to a perch where they remove the legs and wings. Finally, they carry the body back to their nest to feed the larvae.
After locating hives, the hornets prey in numbers which can have a devestating effect on the bee colony as they reduce bee numbers and therefore the amount of pollen / nectar flow entering the hive. This results in the death of the developing larvae. The queens will then either stop or reduce laying eggs leading to a sharp decline in the colony which will also be susceptible to disease due to the poor conditions within the hive.

Risk levels to hive

  • 2 hornets – a healthy hive can cope and maintain normal activity

  • 3/5 hornets -  they disturb the normal activity of the hive and weak hives may succumb

  • 5+ – even healthy hives will have problems unless solution found.

Lifecycle

Asian Hornets only live for one year – at the end of summer the workers and males die off and the queen hibernates. In early May she re-awakens and starts looking for a possible nesting place – we often see queens searching our barns and garden for a place to settle in Spring. If you see an Asian Hornet at this time of year then it is most likely a queen so dispatching it now will reduce the number of nests in the area.

Asian Hornets and Humans

Their sting is similar to ordinary wasps and each hornet is capable of stinging multiples time. They are non-aggressive unless provoked by getting too close to nest, the waving hands or direct attack. The danger from hornets is not the individual sting but multiple stings from busy nests – each hornet is able to sting several times. Obviously, people allergic to stings need immediate treatment as with any other sting.

Removal

Small nests at the start of the season Spring can be destroyed by a powerful aerosol spray (see the one we destroyed above). However larger nests need professional removal – either by the Pompiers or a professional exterminator. To find your local removal expert, ask at your Mairie – Asian Hornets are a notifiable pest and therefore all Mairies should be able to tell you how to get rid of them DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THEM YOURSELF as this can be very dangerous – on entering a nest, 90% of the Asian Hornets present in the nest will come out to attack you. Recently a local farmer tried to shoot a large nest down and was lucky to escape without serious injury – definitely not a good idea! The local Pompiers came and removed the nest, it was at least 1m long and must have contained thousands of hornets – oowww!

Protecting your hives

The best idea is to make traps and place nearby – Planete Passion have a template for simple trap to follow. We have also found that a long handled badminton racket makes a great deterrent if you see a hornet hovering above the hive!

Natural Predators

It has been reported that several species of birds attack nests and feed on the young including magpies and jays.